(The above picture features a person typing away on a broken computer. Or, at least, the screen is broken. Oh well, they’re probably just blind so they don’t need the screen.)

Why are we so addicted to our technology? If you go almost anywhere today, you’ll see a smartphone. And, along with the smartphone, you’ll see its person, happily drooling over the screen as they frolic in endorphins.

Please, people. Let’s put down our iPhones. Let’s close our laptops. Let’s take out the earbuds.

Let’s just be a normal humans, with sadness and happiness and excitement and fear and (yup) boredom. Because every single one of these feelings are important, and techonology puts a damper on them.

If you’re sad, you can just pull of a game or your Instagram and forget your worries.

If you’re happy, you can tell everyone about it and take joy in making others jealous. (I’ve never done that before.)

If you’re excited, you can focus on something else so that the time goes by quicker. You can try to forget the excitement. But then you end up making the thing not as fun because, as is stated in Anne of Green Gables, “Looking forward to things is half the fun of them.”

If you’re fearing something, have no fear (yup), your iPhone is here! Forget that foreign nations could bomb us any day, just scroll through FaceBook and find something to laugh about!

And if you’re bored… Wait at least five minutes before taking out your smartphone. Because it’s good to be bored. Boredom is what gives us cute little drawings from little kids. Boredom is what (no doubt) got us many of the inventions we have today. Who knows, maybe even that smartphone you hold in your hand was a project someone made for themselves so that they wouldn’t be bored.

Boredom is awesome. And the more we try to stifle it, the more it loses its power. The more we come up with easy fixes to our boredom, the less we get done awesome things that change our lives (or change the world).

Here’s an idea for you: take a little break from technology. All of it. Or maybe just as much as you can get away with.

I’ve done it several times, and it can be really freeing. You won’t reach for your iPhone at every whim. You won’t keep your mind percolating on emails constantly. You’ll learn how to spend your evening doing things other than watching the television screen. You won’t be as frazzled by the latest news.And FaceBook will lose its power in your life.

Just say goodbye.

If you’re going to try this, let me know! I’m gonna be doing it this next week, so if you try to email me, I won’t answer for a while. :/ But I will be keeping up on the blog and using this laptop to write my novel, as well as (hopefully) reading more and practicing the piano more.

See you next time!

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5 thoughts on “Take a Break from Technology

  1. Dear Levi,
    I think you are right on with this article for the average person.

    I must say that I keep my computer alive to catch for prayer request from my “Jane’s Prayer Ministry”, or to try to encourage other ladies who are lonely or hurting…

    I have never played a game on the internet nor just on my computer…. Not because I have something against them but because my ministry is more important to me….

    I am not trying to pat myself on the back but, Prayer and counseling are an important part of my life and always has been.

    Since I have become physically restricted to the point that I mostly sit in a chair, do my Bible writing and am not able to work at crocheting, crafting or carving, the Internet has become an outlet for me.

    I also learn a great deal from using Google search.

    Being a prayer partner for:
    Gideon’s International,
    Revive our Hearts,
    Operation Christmas Child,
    Friend’s of Israel,
    To say nothing of the whole Pierpont Tribe…. (tee hee),
    It.s a great JOY to me…

    Besides, if I didn’t cling to my Mac and my iPad, I probably would not be talking to you nor praying intelligently for you as I speak and I would not know what an intelligent, loving, witty person of worth, my #28th grandchild truly is.

    I also stay tuned to messages and messenger to know where my children are who may need prayers. Not to interfere with their business, but to pray for them and just have a normal relationship if we live closer to one another.

    I can say, that you are also absolutely right about the importance of interacting with people and things that need doing should take precedence over cyberspace.

    Love you dearly,
    Grandma

    P.S.
    I have a dear friend who is deaf who only has the computer and printed page, her two cats, and a few neighbors whom she signs and writes notes to, for interaction in her life.

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    1. Yes, surely there is good from technology. All things can be overused, and tech seems all too easy to do that with. I’m certainly glad you’re always there for me:)

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  2. I attempted a week-long media break last year. It was a surprisingly freeing experiences. I only accepted calls, and it turned out that only a few people had important things to say to me. Highly recommend 🙂

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  3. I’ve taken several month-long sabbaticals from media, all of which were highly profitable and encouraging! One surprising thing I discovered is that media tends to stifle creativity (which for some reason, I thought would somehow enhance it). I do like to take a few days here and there to chill from media and “reboot” my creativity. Thanks for the advice here and enjoy your time away! ~Mrs. L

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  4. I’ve taken several month-long sabbaticals from media, all of which were highly profitable and encouraging! One surprising thing I discovered is that media tends to stifle creativity (which for some reason, I thought would somehow enhance it). I do like to take a few days here and there to chill from media and “reboot” my creativity. Thanks for the advice here and enjoy your time away!

    Like

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